Climate Change in Connecticut and in Norwalk, CT

June 17, 2021

climate change in Norwalk, CTDid you know that the 2010s were the hottest decade ever recorded in the Earth’s history?  Climate change isn’t a potential issue that we may have to deal with in the future. It’s a real problem, with global impacts that are already being seen today. Even if we can’t see the ice caps melting here in Connecticut, it’s an undeniable fact that the climate is changing our environment.

To prepare for the challenges ahead, it’s good to educate yourself on the current and future impacts of climate change in CT, and the strategies the government will put in place to solve these issues. The Connecticut climate and geography are already changing. Here are some examples provided by the University of Connecticut’s Adapt CT

Impacts of Climate Change in CT

Rising Temperatures

All over the globe, temperatures are rising. If you live in the Northeast U.S. you may notice that the Connecticut climate in summer is growing hotter and longer every year. There are more ninety-degree days than ever before producing more heatwaves and droughts. 

Vector-Borne Illness

People know Connecticut for the large numbers of ticks in its forests and tall grasses. In fact, Lyme disease was named after the town of Lyme, Connecticut. Warmer temperatures bring more ticks and the increased spread of pathogens.  

Air Pollution

The potential for poor air quality also rises when the days are hotter. Poor air quality leads to health issues, aggravating asthma and other respiratory conditions. It can also affect the heart and cardiovascular system.

Flooding

As a coastal state, flooding is a large issue for Connecticut when it comes to climate change.   Coastal marshes are flooding and drowning, which destroys crucial ecosystems, and homeowners are seeing rising flood insurance rates. Connecticut also faces an increase in precipitation. Climate change causes more intense storms, which means that a lot of rain falls from the sky all at once. That can quickly lead to flood conditions.

Sea Level Rise

Coastal flooding can also be exacerbated by the impacts of sea level rise.  Being a coastal community, Norwalk may be particularly impacted should the worst-case scenarios come to fruition.  This could mean properties permanently or partially underwater, roads potentially underwater and infrastructure impacted.  For further information on sea level rise impacts please see Chapter 9 of the Citywide Plan.

Water Pollution

Pollution from fossil fuel emissions and rainwater runoff hurts many rivers and bodies of water. These bodies of water include the Long Island Sound, and here in Norwalk, Norwalk Harbor, and the Norwalk River.Polluted runoff can negatively impact water-based economies such as shellfishing and recreation. 

Solutions to Climate Change in CT and Norwalk 

The state of Connecticut and city governments are working on solutions to both mitigate the effects of climate change, or make adaptations. Here are some examples of climate actions and plans:

Renewable Energy

The state government has dedicated itself to the decrease of fossil fuel emissions by promoting renewable energy sources. The Global Warming Solutions Act sets targets to reduce emissions by 80% from 2001 levels by 2050. 

In Connecticut, the transportation sector gives off the largest percentage of greenhouse gas emissions. As part of the state’s effort to reduce greenhouse gasses, the EVConnecticut program is funding the creation and set-up of electric car charging stations throughout the state encouraging residents to buy electric cars. 

In Norwalk, EV stations have been set up in a number of municipal parking areas, including the South Norwalk train station and Maritime Garage.

Water and Wetland Protection  

In Norwalk, about 22% of residents have private drinking water wells that draw mainly from bedrock aquifers. The Norwalk Aquifer Protection Agency  was established in 2009 to regulate businesses located nearby the aquifers to make sure your drinking water isn’t polluted. 

The  Norwalk Conservation Commission and Inland Wetlands Agency enforces the State and City’s Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Regulations. The Commission has a compliance officer who reviews building permits for wetlands issues. 

Another example of water protection is Norwalk’s partnership with Harbor Watch, an environmental organization, to identify, locate, and eliminate illegal discharges into drainage areas, coastal areas and rivers.

Stormwater Management

The city of Norwalk is taking direct action to prevent stormwater from polluting its rivers and flooding its city streets. For example, the Norwalk Harbor Management Commission created a plan to manage stormwater runoff from the Yankee Doodle I-95 bridge. 

Additionally, the city is promoting green infrastructure and low impact development as a way to reduce runoff and facilitate on-site infiltration of stormwater. These measures not only reduce pollution of inland and coastal waters, they can play an important role in reducing flooding. 

Combating the Causes of Climate Change in CT

Even though we’re already experiencing the effects of climate change and global warming, the state and local governments are working hard to promote actionable solutions.  Norwalk is part of Sustainable CT, a voluntary certification program founded by the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities and other partners.  Norwalk recently achieved a bronze certification from the group in recognition of the community’s sustainability accomplishments.  

To learn more about the changing climate in Norwalk, CT, and how the City is planning for it, see pages 141 – 161 of the 10-year Citywide Plan.

See the Citywide Plan